History of Atari Arcade Games

This timeline contains a history of popular classic arcade games released by Atari Corporation in the late 70's and 80's.

Timeline Banner
June 1972
Picture
June 1972  
Atari Inc Founded

Timeline Image

Atari Inc is incorporated in the state of California by Nolan Bushnell and Ted Dadney.

November 1972
Picture
November 1972  
Pong

Timeline Image

Pong is one of the earliest arcade video games and the very first sports arcade video game. It is a table tennis sports game featuring simple two-dimensional graphics. 

While other arcade video games such as Computer Space came before it, Pong was one of the first video games to reach mainstream popularity. The aim is to defeat an opponent in a simulated table-tennis game by earning a higher score. 

The game was originally manufactured by Atari, which released it in 1972. Allan Alcorn created Pong as a training exercise assigned to him by Atari co-founder Nolan Bushnell. Bushnell based the idea on an electronic ping-pong game included in the Magnavox Odyssey, which later resulted in a lawsuit against Atari. Surprised by the quality of Alcorn's work, Bushnell and Atari co-founder Ted Dabney decided to manufacture the game.

Pong quickly became a success and is the first commercially successful arcade video game machine, which helped to establish the video game industry along with the first home console, the Magnavox Odyssey. Soon after its release, several companies began producing games that copied Pong's gameplay, and eventually released new types of games. As a result, Atari encouraged its staff to produce more innovative games. The company released several sequels that built upon the original's gameplay by adding new features. During the 1975 Christmas season, Atari released a home version of Pong exclusively through Sears retail stores. It was also a commercial success and led to numerous copies.

  Read more
April 1976
Picture
April 1976  
Breakout

Timeline Image

Breakout is an arcade game developed and published by Atari, Inc. It was conceptualized by Nolan Bushnell and Steve Bristow, influenced by the 1972 Atari arcade game Pong, and built by Steve Wozniak aided by Steve Jobs. The game was ported to multiple platforms and upgraded to video games such as Super Breakout. In addition, Breakout was the basis and inspiration for certain aspects of the Apple II personal computer.

In the game, a layer of bricks lines the top third of the screen. A ball travels across the screen, bouncing off the top and side walls of the screen. When a brick is hit, the ball bounces away and the brick is destroyed. The player loses a turn when the ball touches the bottom of the screen. To prevent this from happening, the player has a movable paddle to bounce the ball upward, keeping it in play.

  Read more
October 1976
Picture
October 1976  
Night Driver

Timeline Image

Night Driver is an arcade game developed by Ted Michon and licensed by Atari Inc for release in the United States in October, 1976. 

Originally licensed by Atari from German firm Micronetics whom Ted Michon had sold the game to and had released the game in 1977 as Night Racer. Ted's version was in turn inspired by the earlier discrete coin-op Nürburgring 1. It is considered one of the earliest first-person racing video games, and is commonly believed to be one of the first published games to display real-time first-person graphics.

The player controls a car which must be driven along a road at nighttime without crashing into the sides of the road as indicated by road side reflectors. The game is controlled with a single pedal for gas, a wheel for steering and a four-selection lever for gear shifting. 

The coin-operated game had a choice of three difficulties, novice, pro, and expert, from which the player could choose at game start. The turns were sharper and more frequent on the more difficult tracks. As play progresses, the road gets narrower and more winding.

  Read more
June 1978
Picture
June 1978  
Fire Truck

Timeline Image

Fire Truck is a black-and-white arcade game. It was developed and published by Atari, Inc.. According to GamesRadar, it was the earliest video game with cooperative gameplay where two players were forced to work together. A one-player version of the game, called Smokey Joe was also released. This was internally identical to Fire Truck.

Fire Truck is built on the technology created for Atari's Super Bug released the previous year. Both games were programmed by Howard Delman.

  Read more
August 1979
Picture
August 1979  
Lunar Lander

Timeline Image

Lunar Lander is an arcade game released by Atari, Inc. in August 1979, which uses a vector monitor to display vector graphics. The game is a variant on the Lunar Lander concept, which dates back to 1969.

The object of the Lunar Lander game is to pilot a lunar landing module to a safe touchdown on the moon. Approximately 4,830 units were produced. The vector-graphics generator of the arcade game was the impetus for Atari's most successful coin-operated game, Asteroids.

The objective of Lunar Lander is to pilot a lunar landing module as it prepares to touch down on the moon. The terrain is very jagged and has only a few flat areas appropriate for landing. These areas are highlighted with a flashing bonus multiplier, which is higher for smaller areas. 

If the player successfully lands the module, he or she is awarded points based on how good the landing was and the difficulty of the landing site. If he or she crashes, points are awarded based on the severity of the crash and sometimes the player receives a fuel penalty. In either case, the game starts another round with a different set of terrain and the player's remaining fuel. The game is over when the player has run out of fuel and crashes onto the moon's surface.

  Read more
November 1979
Picture
November 1979  
Asteroids

Timeline Image

Asteroids is an arcade space shooter released in November 1979 by Atari, Inc. and designed by Lyle Rains, Ed Logg, and Dominic Walsh. The player controls a spaceship in anasteroid field which is periodically traversed by flying saucers. The object of the game is to shoot and destroy asteroids and saucers while not colliding with either or being hit by the saucers' counter-fire. The game becomes harder as the number of asteroids increases.

Asteroids was one of the first major hits of the golden age of arcade games. The game sold over 70,000 arcade cabinets and proved both popular with players and influential with developers. It has since been ported to multiple platforms. Asteroids was widely imitated and directly influenced Defender, Gravitar, and many other video games.

Asteroids was conceived during a meeting between Logg and Rains and used hardware developed by Howard Delman previously used for Lunar Lander. Based on an unfinished game titled Cosmos and inspired by Spacewar! and Computer Space, both early shoot 'em up video games, Asteroids' physics model and control scheme were derived by Logg from these earlier games and refined through trial and error. The game is rendered on a vector display in a two-dimensional view that wraps around in both screen axes.

The objective of Asteroids is to destroy asteroids and saucers. The player controls a triangular ship that can rotate left and right, fire shots straight forward, and thrust forward. Once the ship begins moving in a direction, it will continue in that direction for a time without player intervention unless the player applies thrust in a different direction. The ship eventually comes to a stop when not thrusting. The player can also send the ship into hyperspace, causing it to disappear and reappear in a random location on the screen, at the risk of self-destructing or appearing on top of an asteroid.

  Read more
January 1980
Picture
January 1980  
Warlords

Timeline Image

Warlords is an arcade game released by Atari, Inc. in 1980.The game resembles a combination of Breakout and Quadrapong (an early Atari arcade game) in the sense that not only can up to 4 players play the game at the same time, but also the "forts" in the four corners of the screen are brick walls that could be broken with a flaming ball.

Warlords uses spinner controllers for player control, and came in both an upright 2 player version and a 4 player cocktail version. The upright version uses a black and white monitor, and reflects the game image onto a mirror, with a backdrop of castles, giving the game a 3D feel. The upright version only supports up to two simultaneous players, which move through the levels as a team. The cocktail version is in color, and supports 1-4 players. 3-4 player games are free-for-all's where the game ends as soon as one player wins. 1-2 player games play identical to the upright version.

  Read more
Picture
January 1980  
Black Widow

Timeline Image

Black Widow is a vector arcade game developed by Atari released in 1982. The player takes the role of a Black widow spider defending a web from invading bugs. The player must move the spider around the web while simultaneously shooting/avoiding various bugs and collecting the bonuses that appear after the enemies are eliminated. The game is a twin-stick shooter in the vein of Robotron: 2084 by Williams, but with fewer enemies on-screen.

To destroy certain enemies, the player must lure other enemies into destroying them. There is also the Bug Slayer, a bug that helps the player eliminate enemies, with only loss of potential points being the only consequence. 

The Bug Slayer can help the player in tough situations, but can also prevent the player from achieving the number of extra lives necessary to endure later, more difficult, rounds. Also, other enemies appear on the playing field as eggs, laid by other enemies. The player can move these eggs off the playing field to both eliminate the enemy and receive points, before it reaches maturity.

  Read more
June 1980
Picture
June 1980  
Centipede

Timeline Image

Centipede is a vertically oriented shoot 'em up arcade game produced by Atari, Inc. in 1980. The game was designed by Ed Logg and Dona Bailey. The player defends against centipedes, spiders, scorpions and fleas, completing a round after eliminating the centipede that winds down the playing field.

The player is represented by a small player at the bottom of the screen. The player moves the character about the bottom area of the screen with a trackball and fires laser shots at a centipede advancing from the top of the screen down through a field of mushrooms. Shooting any section of the centipede creates a mushroom; shooting one of the middle segments splits the centipede into two pieces at that point. Each piece then continues independently on its way down the board, with the first section of the rear piece becoming a new head. If the head is destroyed, the section behind it becomes the next head.

The centipede starts at the top of the screen, traveling either left or right. When it hits a mushroom or the edge of the screen, it drops one level and switches direction. Thus, more mushrooms on the screen cause the centipede to descend more rapidly. The player can destroy mushrooms by shooting them, but each takes four hits to destroy.

If the centipede reaches the bottom of the screen, it moves back and forth within the player area and one-segment "head" centipedes are periodically added. This continues until the player has eliminated both the original centipede and all heads. When all the centipede's segments are destroyed, a new centipede forms at the top of the screen. Every time a centipede is eliminated, however, the next one is one segment shorter and is accompanied by one additional, fast-moving "head" centipede.

  Read more
July 1980
Picture
July 1980  
Missile Command

Timeline Image

Missile Command is a 1980 arcade game by Atari, Inc. that was also licensed to Sega for European release. It is considered one of the most notable games from the Golden Age of Video Arcade Games.

The player's six cities are being attacked by an endless hail of ballistic missiles, some of them even splitting like multiple independently targetable reentry vehicles (MIRVs). New weapons are introduced in later levels: smart bombs that can evade a less than perfectly targeted missile, and bomber planes and satellites that fly across the screen and launch missiles of their own. As a regional commander of three anti-missile batteries, the player must defend six cities in their zone from being destroyed.

The game is played by moving a crosshair across the sky background via a trackball and pressing one of three buttons to launch a counter-missile from the appropriate battery. Counter-missiles explode upon reaching the crosshair, leaving a fireball that persists for several seconds and destroys any enemy missiles that enter it. There are three batteries, each with ten missiles; a missile battery becomes useless when all its missiles are fired, or if the battery is destroyed by enemy fire. The missiles of the central battery fly to their targets at much greater speed; only these missiles can effectively kill a smart bomb at a distance.

  Read more
November 1980
Picture
November 1980  
Battlezone

Timeline Image

Battlezone is a first person tank combat arcade game from Atari released in November 1980. The player controls a tank which is attacked by other tanks and missiles. The game uses wireframe vector graphics on a black and white (with green and red sectioned color overlay) vector monitor. It was designed by Ed Rotberg, who designed many games for Atari Inc., Atari Games, and Sente.

Gameplay is on a plane with a mountainous horizon featuring an erupting volcano, distant crescent moon, and various geometric solids (in vector outline) like pyramids and blocks. The player views the screen, which includes an overhead radar view to find and destroy the rather slow tanks, or the faster moving supertanks. Saucer-shaped UFOs and guided missiles occasionally appear for a bonus opportunity. The saucers differ from the tanks in that they do not fire upon the player, and do not appear on radar. The player can hide behind the solids or maneuver in rapid turns once fired on to buy time with which to fire himself.

  Read more
October 1981
Picture
October 1981  
Tempest

Timeline Image

Tempest is a 1981 arcade game by Atari Inc., designed and programmed by Dave Theurer. It takes place on a three-dimensional surface, sometimes wrapped into a tube, which is viewed from one end and is divided into a dozen or more segments or lanes. The player controls a claw-shaped spaceship (named Blaster) that crawls along the near edge of the playfield, moving from segment to segment.

Tempest used the Atari's Color-QuadraScan vector display technology. It was also the first game to allow the player to choose their starting level (a system Atari dubbed "SkillStep"). This feature increases the maximum starting level depending on the player's performance in the previous game, essentially allowing the player to continue. 

Tempest was one of the first video games to sport a progressive level design in which the levels themselves varied rather than giving the player the same layout with increasing difficulty levels.

The objective of Tempest is to survive as long as possible and score as many points as possible by clearing the screen of enemies that have landed on the playing field. The player's ship can rapid-fire shots down the tube, destroying any enemies within the same segment, and is also equipped with a Superzapper, which destroys all enemies currently on the playfield once per level.

The game consists of sixteen screens with unique geometric shapes, some of which are closed tubes that allow the player to loop around, while others are open fields that have distinct left and right endpoints. When all sixteen screens have been played, the sequence repeats with a different color scheme and a higher difficulty level, including the invisible (black) levels (65–80). 

  Read more
January 1982
Picture
January 1982  
Space Duel

Timeline Image

Space Duel is an arcade game released in 1982 by Atari Inc. It is a direct descendant of the original Asteroids, with asteroids replaced by colorful geometric shapes like cubes, diamonds, and spinning pinwheels. Space Duel is the first and only multi-player vector game by Atari. When Asteroids Deluxe did not sell well, this game was taken off the shelf and released to moderate success.

The player has five buttons: two to rotate the ship left or right, one to shoot, one to activate the thruster, and one for force field. Shooting all objects on the screen completes a level.Space Duel, Asteroids, Asteroids Deluxe and Gravitar all used similar 5-button controlling system.

Space Duel offers players a choice of 4 different game versions. One player can control a fighter or a space station. Two players, playing at the same time, can control fighters or a space station. 

The game offers players 12 different targets (7 split when hit), and 18 different waves. At the beginning of each wave, objects enter from the screen edge. The player(s) then tries to shoot and destroy the objects. The wave ends when all the objects are destroyed.

  Read more
April 1982
Picture
April 1982  
Dig Dug

Timeline Image

Dig Dug is an arcade game developed and published by Namco in Japan in 1982. It runs on Namco Galaga hardware, and was published outside Japan by Atari, Inc.

The objective of Dig Dug is to eliminate underground-dwelling monsters by inflating them with an air pump until they explode, or by dropping rocks on them. There are two kinds of enemies in the game: "Pookas" (a race of cute round red monsters, said to be modeled after tomatoes, that wear yellow goggles) and "Fygars" (a race of green dragons that can breathe fire while their wings flash).

The player's character is the eponymous Dig Dug, dressed in white and blue and able to dig tunnels through dirt. Dig Dug will be killed if he is caught by either a Pooka or a Fygar, burned by a Fygar's fire, or crushed by a rock.

The cocktail version features two control panels, each with a fourway joystick and a Pump button on the left and righthand side of the stick. The 13inch Electrohome color raster monitor is mounted vertically and the screen image flips for each player. The top glass features the game instructions, point values and cartoon renditions of Fygar, Pooka and Dig Dug.

  Read more
Picture
April 1982  
Millipede

Timeline Image

Millipede is a 1982 arcade game by Atari, Inc. and is the sequel to the arcade hit, Centipede. The objective of the game is to score as many points as possible by destroying all segments of the millipede as it moves toward the bottom of the screen, as well as destroying and avoiding other enemies. 

The game is played with a trackball and a single fire button, which can be held down for rapid-fire. The game is over when the player's last life is lost.

Similar to Centipede, the object of the game is to destroy a millipede that advances downward from the top of the screen. The millipede travels horizontally until it either hits an obstacle or reaches the edge of the screen, after which it drops one row and reverses direction. 

Once the millipede enters the player's gray maneuvering area, it stays there and extra heads appear at intervals until both they and the millipede are destroyed. Shooting a body segment splits the millipede in two, with the rear portion sprouting its own head. A collision with any enemy costs the player one life.

  Read more
December 1982
Picture
December 1982  
Quantum

Timeline Image

Quantum is a color vector arcade game designed by General Computer Corp. for Atari Inc. and released in December 1982. 

The premise of the game is related loosely to quantum physics in that the player directs a probe with a trackball to encircle atomic "particles" for points, without touching various other particles. Once the particles are surrounded by the probe's tail they are destroyed.

Entering one's initials for the game's high score table was unique compared to all other games of the era; the player would use the trackball to circle the letters of his or her initials in the same fashion that was used to circle the particles during gameplay. 

If the player achieved the highest score on the table, the initials screen was preceded by another in which the player would use the trackball to actually draw his or her initials in an entry box. Some players were adept enough with the trackball to actually write their names legibly in the box.

  Read more
January 1983
Picture
January 1983  
Crystal Castles

Timeline Image

Crystal Castles is an arcade game released by Atari, Inc. in 1983. The player controls the character Bentley Bear who has to collect gems located throughout trimetric-projected rendered castles while avoiding enemies out to get him as well as the gems. 

Crystal Castles is notable for being one of the first arcade action games with an actual ending, whereas most games of the time either continued indefinitely, ended in what was termed a kill screen or simply just restarted from the first level, and to contain advance warp zones.

  Read more
Picture
January 1983  
Star Wars

Timeline Image

Star Wars is an arcade game produced by Atari Inc. and released in 1983. The game is a first person space combat game, simulating the attack on the Death Star from the 1977 filmStar Wars. The game is composed of 3D color vector graphics. 

The player assumes the role of Luke Skywalker ("Red Five"), as he pilots an X-wing fighter from a first-person perspective. Unlike other arcade games of similar nature, the player does not have to destroy every enemy in order to advance through the game; he must simply survive as his fighter flies through the level, which most often means he must avoid or destroy the shots that enemies fire. Each hit on his craft takes away one shield (of the six he started out with), and if he runs out of shields and takes another hit, the game ends.

  Read more
March 1983
Picture
March 1983  
Food Fight

Timeline Image

In Food Fight, the player controls a young boy named Charley Chuck. The object of the game is to eat an ice cream cone located on the opposite side of an open playfield. The ice cream is slowly melting, and must be consumed before it melts completely. Standing between Charley and the ice cream are four chefs named Angelo, Jacques, Oscar, and Zorba.

  Read more
January 1984
Picture
January 1984  
Return of the Jedi

Timeline Image

Star Wars: Return of the Jedi is a 1984 arcade game by Atari, Inc. and the follow-up to the first Star Wars arcade game. The game uses raster graphics, rather than vector graphicswhich were used for the first and third Atari arcade games based on the Star Wars franchise. 

The player takes control of three different vehicles in stages based upon the Return of the Jedi film. Gameplay is from a 3/4 isometrically projectedperspective and is broken into several stages. In the first stage, the player pilots a speeder bike to the Ewok village. The next stage involves piloting the Millennium Falcon to destroy a reactor. Another speeder bike stage follows. The final stage involves piloting both an AT-ST and the Millennium Falcon in rapid succession in a fight against a star destroyer.

  Read more
Picture
January 1984  
Paperboy

Timeline Image

Paperboy is a 1985 arcade game by Atari Games originally developed in 1984. The players take the role of a paperboy who delivers a fictional newspaper called "The Daily Sun" along a suburban street on his bicycle. 

The object of the game is to perfectly deliver papers to subscribers for an entire week and avoid crashing (which counts as one of the player's lives) before the week ends. The game lasts for seven in-game days, Monday through Sunday.

The player controls a paperboy on a bicycle delivering newspapers along a suburban street which is displayed in a cabinet perspective (oroblique projection) view. The player attempts to deliver a week of daily newspapers to subscribing customers, attempts to vandalize non-subscribers' homes and must avoid hazards along the street. Subscribers are lost by missing a delivery or damaging a subscriber's house.

Controlling the paperboy with the handlebar controls, the player attempts to deliver newspapers to subscribers. Each day begins by showing an overview of the street indicating subscribers and non-subscribers. Subscribers and non-subscribers' homes are also easy to discern in the level itself, with subscribers living in brightly colored houses, and non-subscribers living in dark houses.

  Read more
Picture
January 1984  
Marble Madness

Timeline Image

Marble Madness is an arcade video game designed by Mark Cerny and published by Atari Games in 1984.

 The player uses a trackball to guide an onscreen marble through six obstacle-filled courses within a time limit. Marble Madness was Atari's first game to use the Atari System 1 hardware and to be programmed in the C programming language. It was also one of the first games to use true stereo sound; previous games used either monaural sound or simulated stereo.

Cerny drew inspiration from miniature golf, racing games, and artwork by M. C. Escher. He applied a minimalist approach in designing the appearance of the game's courses and enemies.

Marble Madness was commercially successful. The game was ported to numerous platforms and inspired the development of other games. A sequel was developed and planned for release in 1991, but canceled when location testing showed the game could not compete with other titles.

  Read more
June 1984
Picture
June 1984  
I, Robot

Timeline Image

I, Robot is an arcade game designed by Dave Theurer and published by Atari Inc.. It was developed in 1983 and released in June 1984. Atari originally intended to release the game in 1983, but it was delayed due to technical issues and difficulties, so it was returned to the lab for further testing and research, and was not fully released until June 1984.

The object of the game involves the servant bot going through 126 levels, turning red squares to blue to destroy Big Brother's shield and eye. The player can switch to the second game, Doodle City, a drawing tool that lasts for three minutes.

I, Robot is known for being the first commercially produced video game with filled 3-D polygon graphics with flat shading, as well as being the first video game to feature camera-control options. Its name was originally "Ice Castles", but was changed to "I, Robot".

  Read more
January 1985
Picture
January 1985  
Gauntlet

Timeline Image

Gauntlet is noted as being one of the first multi-player dungeon crawl arcade games.

The players, up to four at once in the arcade version, select among four playable fantasy-based characters: The Warrior, Wizard, Valkyrie, or Elf. Each character has his or her own unique strength and weaknesses. For example, the Warrior is strongest in hand-to-hand combat, the Wizard has the most powerful magic, the Valkyrie has the best armor and the Elf is the fastest in movement.

Upon selecting a playable character, the gameplay is set within a series of top-down, third-person perspective mazes where the object is to find and touch the designated exit in every level. An assortment of special items can be located in each level that increase player's character's health, unlock doors, gain more points and magical potions that can destroy all of the enemies on screen.

The enemies are an assortment of fantasy-based monsters, including ghosts, grunts, demons, lobbers, sorcerers and thieves. Each enters the level through specific generators, which can be destroyed. While there are no bosses in the game, the most dangerous enemy is "Death", who can not only drain a character's health, but is difficult to destroy.

  Read more
Picture
January 1985  
Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back

Timeline Image

Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back is the sequel to the vector graphics Star Wars arcade game. It was released by Atari Games in 1985 as a conversion kit for the original game. 

As in Star Wars, the player takes the role of Luke Skywalker in a set of familiar battle sequences in a first-person perspective. Specifically, the arcade features the Battle of Hoth and the subsequent escape of the Millennium Falcon through an asteroid field. 

The game takes the original gameplay, graphics, sounds, from the first arcade game and updates them to fit the new movie. Vector objects are now much more noticeably detailed, and the asterisk-particle shots from Star Wars are replaced with vector versions. The game was the third Star Wars arcade game with Return of the Jedi, which came out the previous year.

  Read more
January 1986
Picture
January 1986  
Gaultlet II

Timeline Image

Gauntlet II was released in 1996 by Atari and is a fantasy-themed hack and slash game.

The gameplay is very similar to the original Gauntlet, a topdown dungeon crawl supporting up to four players. The biggest difference from the original game is that players can choose identical classes, instead of being limited to a particular one for each joystick; each player is differentiated by color. Thus, instead of having a "warrior", "wizard", and "valkyrie" (for instance), in Gauntlet II there could be a "red wizard", a "blue elf" and a "green warrior"

In addition to the new "class" system, new level designs were added, including the possibility of encountering them in altered ways by having the play-field turned in steps of 90°. Other new features included the enemy "It", which upon contact would make a player "It" and draw all enemies towards him/her. The only way to release this curse is by touching another player or entering the exit, turning any level containing "It" into a fantasy filled game of tag. 

Other notable additions include the ability to ricochet shots off walls by means of a special pick-up, acid puddles that caused large, predetermined amounts of damage and a large dragon which would occupy multiple squares and require multiple hits to destroy.

  Read more
January 1988
Picture
January 1988  
Vindicators

Timeline Image

Vindicators is a one or two player arcade game released by Atari Games in 1988. The game begins by asking the player(s) to choose a difficulty level, not only making the enemies more difficult and the players weaker, but higher difficulties start the players in a later set of levels (called "galaxies") and with some powerups. 

The easiest difficulty level starts the player(s) in the first level with no bonuses. The player controls a tank with constantly draining fuel, and must navigate through multiple levels (14 stations in the arcade version) from bottom to top, encountering obstacles and enemies. Along the way, a player may find powerups including tank fuel, stars (currency), shields, and two types of sub-weapons: smart shots (homing missiles) and bombs (powerful rockets). 

Each level has a key that will open a door at the top of the level, which will either take the player to the next level or to a special hub with multiple powerups that must be escaped in 10 seconds or less. If the player is unable to escape, the tank will lose half its fuel. After escaping the hub, the player(s) then proceeds to the next station.

  Read more
January 1989
Picture
January 1989  
Hard Drivin'

Timeline Image

Hard Drivin' is a driving arcade game that invites players to test drive a high-powered sports car on stunt and speed courses. 

The game featured one of the first 3D polygon driving environments via a simulator cabinet, rendered with a custom architecture. The force feedback, car physics simulator, game design and most game programming were done by Max Behensky. 

According to the in-game credit screen, Hard Drivin' was designed by two teams working concurrently in the United States and Ireland.

  Read more


User Comments

Leave comments to discuss this timeline with the community.